Home

A30 Numbers


What number is that Alberg 30?

Do you mean the hull number, the sail number, the manufacturer's serial number or the Coast Guard HIN? Or maybe you mean the Coast Guard documentation number (which you can look up) or other government registration number?

The hull number and sail number are pretty much synonymous, but there are some wrinkles. On some early boats, the same sail number was assigned to two boats with a "US" prefix for the boat sent to the United States and a "KC" prefix for the boat staying in Canada. I'm not sure how these numbers relate to the hull number.

Other boats do not use the class sail number. Usually this is because they race (or did race) under PHRF rules and use the number assigned by the local PHRF organization. In other cases, the number is just plain wrong, usually because the sail was purchased second-hand and the number was never changed.

The manufacturer's serial number is found on the builder's plate fastened to the exterior bulkhead just below the companionway and above the bridge deck. The normal format of this number is a two-digit length ("30"), a two-digit year of manufacture, and a three-digit hull number. Some boats have these elements in a different order, however.

U.S. federal law has required a Hull Identification Number (HIN) on all boats manufactured or imported after November 1, 1972. On the Alberg 30, this is number impressed into the upper starboard corner of the transom. This 12-character number starts with a 3-letter Manufacturer Id Code (MIC). For the Alberg 30, this is either WBW or ZWB. This is followed by a 5-character serial number. On an Alberg 30, this should be "30" and the 3-digit hull number. This hull number should match the one on the builder's plate, but they don't always do so. Finally, the date of manufacture is indicated with a 2-digit month and 2-digit year. Note there are other variations on the HIN numbering scheme, but I've not seen them on an Alberg 30.

On a few boats, there is a discrepancy between the serial number on the builder's plate and the one in the HIN.

Year of manufacture

I'm trying to determine the manufacturing year for each hull number. My data may be incomplete or inaccurate, but this is what I've got:
 Hull Number
Year BuiltLowHigh
1963US1US5
1964757
196558132
1966133201
1967202276
1968277355
1969356405
1970406449
1971450488
1972489523
1973524550
1974551569
1975570593
1976594610
1977611622
1978623633
1979635643
1980644650
1981651656
1982700701
1983702703
1984704704

It's tough, because Whitby was more interested in making boats than in keeping records. And sometimes the numbers, for whatever reason, didn't come out in order. Hear are some exceptions reported to me:

  • Hull 284 is apparently a 1967 boat, as the serial number is 3067284

Brief Histories of Boats

Bob Kirk (with some formatting help from Mike Meinhold) compiled a spreadsheet of the histories, as he has been able to determine, of boats by boat number. Jonathan Bresler has taken over maintenance of this spreadsheet. You can download this spreadsheet to view it. Please let Jonathan know if you have any further information, or corrections, to the data in this spreadsheet.

Note: if you don't have Microsoft Excel, you might want to download either OpenOffice, or LibreOffice, both free office suites that can read most Microsoft Office files.


Offshore Sailing book cover Offshore Sailing by Bill Seifert with Daniel Spurr

We went to a Windjammers lecture to hear Bill Seifert and I was impressed enough to buy the book on the spot. I've heard a lot of people talk about ways to improve a boat, but I've never heard one person suggest so many good ideas that I hadn't considered. Part of the charm is the specificity of the suggestions. Everyone says you should secure your floorboards, hatchboards and batteries. Bill shows good suggestions on how to do so.

The suggestions are very practical for the do-it-yourselfer, too. Many show how to make or adapt inexpensive solutions. Tip #12 on closing the deck blower vents is one that will pay off for me without ever going offshore. I'll implement that one to stop the wintertime storms from finding their way belowdecks.

Besides modifications, the book also includes advice for operating offshore, cooking, boat selection, dealing with bureaucracy, and more.

Bill Seifert has worked at Tartan, TPI, and Alden Yachts. He's a veteran of many Marion-Bermuda races and now runs his own yacht management company. His tips are born of experience--not of book-learning--and it shows. He obviously knows his stuff.



Amazon Associates logo

Privacy and other policies
page created by George Dinwiddie
webmaster@alberg30.org
copyright © 1995-2017, all rights reserved
Last modified: Friday 14-Dec-2018